Animals Tumblr Themes

Link Post Sat, Apr. 19, 2014 1 note

18 Awesome Facts About Giant Isopods         

The individual isopods they talk about here at at the Aquarium of the Pacific. I tried taking some photos of them a couple of weeks ago.

(Although I think they wanted the word penes; they spelled it how it’s pronounced.)

There’s also a link to an entire album of songs about giant isopods!




Video Post Mon, Apr. 14, 2014 6,115 notes

infinity-imagined:

Artistic microscope slides produced in the Victorian era (1840~1900) by arranging hundreds of tiny diatoms into intricate patterns.  This was often accomplished by using a single hair to move the diatoms in a special chamber that prevented disturbance to the slide.  The fabrication of these amazing objects must have required incredible patience, attention to detail, and a steady hand.

(Source: victorianmicroscopeslides.com, via madgeneticist)





Video Post Tue, Apr. 01, 2014 1 note

Shrimpfish, in the same order as seahorses and pipefish. It’s thought they adopt this head down posture because they like to hide among sea urchin spines and vertical weeds; but they swim - horizontally, but vertically - pretty well that way too…

This was also at AOP; please forgive the weird reflections and slight blurriness. Last time I was there they had maybe three or four in a tiny tank of maybe two gallons, and now they have a school of them!  The tank is this sort of wedge-shaped thing with no air surface on the display side.

Note: there are also ribbon pipehorses near the bottom in this video.

Not sure what’s going on here - it plays on my dash and posts page but not on  my main page.  If you can’t see it let me know and I’ll put up a link.






Text Post Sun, Mar. 23, 2014 645 notes

griseus:

ALL THE DUMBO OCTOPUS SPECIES

The following 14 species are included in the genus Grimpoteuthis

Grimpoteuthis abyssicolaimage

Grimpoteuthis bathynectes

image

G. boylei

image

G challengeri

image

G. discoveryi

image

G. hippocrepium

image

G. innominata

image

G. meangensis (was originally described from a single, damaged animal of unknown sex. A full illustration was never made)

image

Grimpoteuthis megaptera

image

G. pacifica

image

image

G. plena

image

G. tuftsi

image

G. umbellata

image

G wuelkeri

image

aw, grimpos, you so kyoot…

(via scientificillustration)






Photo Post Fri, Mar. 14, 2014 613,364 notes

gerardkingofhell:

softroot:

Sometimes i forget scallops swim like this its hilarious

I THOUGHT THAT ONLY HAPPENED ON SPONGEBOB

I’m not sure it’s general knowledge, but Stephen HIllenburg, creator of Spongebob, has a degree in Marine Biology from Humboldt State University, same as me.  Well, actually Biology, with a Marine specialization, which is how Humboldt does it. I think we must have been in a few of the same classes, as we overlapped, although I don’t recognize him from pictures. But I’m always amused when a little actual marine biology shows up on the show, like when Spongebob says, “No, my people are sessile.  I’m just gonna stay here and filter feed.”

gerardkingofhell:

softroot:

Sometimes i forget scallops swim like this its hilarious

I THOUGHT THAT ONLY HAPPENED ON SPONGEBOB

I’m not sure it’s general knowledge, but Stephen HIllenburg, creator of Spongebob, has a degree in Marine Biology from Humboldt State University, same as me.  Well, actually Biology, with a Marine specialization, which is how Humboldt does it. I think we must have been in a few of the same classes, as we overlapped, although I don’t recognize him from pictures. But I’m always amused when a little actual marine biology shows up on the show, like when Spongebob says, “No, my people are sessile.  I’m just gonna stay here and filter feed.”

(Source: gifsofanimalsinfilm, via sciencetoastudent)




Photo Post Tue, Mar. 11, 2014 66,387 notes

overland-and-sea:

look at all those majestic sea pancakes


Where’s the butter and syrup?

overland-and-sea:

look at all those majestic sea pancakes

Where’s the butter and syrup?

(via shipsshipships)




Photo Post Wed, Mar. 05, 2014 243 notes

rhamphotheca:

Longbarb Scaly Dragonfish
Fire in the Sea, published by Texas A&M University Press


This species has an extremely long—six to 11 times the length of the head—chin barbel, which is tipped with a bulb and filaments that produce light. “The night belonged to him. The light belonged to him. He hung it from a long whip from his chin. Squid and red shrimps and foolish fish came to see in the golden glow of his chandelier the promise of dining,” Compton wrote.

(via: Popular Science)

This is a book for my wish list!

rhamphotheca:

Longbarb Scaly Dragonfish

Fire in the Sea, published by Texas A&M University Press
This species has an extremely long—six to 11 times the length of the head—chin barbel, which is tipped with a bulb and filaments that produce light. “The night belonged to him. The light belonged to him. He hung it from a long whip from his chin. Squid and red shrimps and foolish fish came to see in the golden glow of his chandelier the promise of dining,” Compton wrote.

This is a book for my wish list!




Photo Post Wed, Mar. 05, 2014 150 notes

rhamphotheca:

The Frilled Shark
Fire in the Sea, published by Texas A&M University Press


This shark species, shown at right with a squid in its jaws, is rarely found outside of the benthic zone. “Neither squid nor shark desired outside help and interference,” Compton wrote in his narrative.
(via: Popular Science)

rhamphotheca:

The Frilled Shark

Fire in the Sea, published by Texas A&M University Press

This shark species, shown at right with a squid in its jaws, is rarely found outside of the benthic zone. “Neither squid nor shark desired outside help and interference,” Compton wrote in his narrative.

(via: Popular Science)




Photo Post Wed, Mar. 05, 2014 89 notes

rhamphotheca:


Batfish

from Fire in the Sea, published by Texas A&M University Press
The round, flat batfish is primarily found in the western Atlantic ocean and the Gulf of Mexico. “Batfish are about as reliable in sustained swim as a scallop is; however, they can make two jumps and a gobble from prone position faster than a Sidewinder Rattlesnake can strike second time,” Compton wrote.
(via: Popular Science)

rhamphotheca:

Batfish
from Fire in the Sea, published by Texas A&M University Press

The round, flat batfish is primarily found in the western Atlantic ocean and the Gulf of Mexico. “Batfish are about as reliable in sustained swim as a scallop is; however, they can make two jumps and a gobble from prone position faster than a Sidewinder Rattlesnake can strike second time,” Compton wrote.

(via: Popular Science)




Link Post Thu, Feb. 27, 2014 53 notes

Meet the Icefish.

excalculus:

I have free time, and that means more biology! Today’s creature is one I’ve been meaning to write about for a while: the crocodile icefish, Pagetopsis macropterus.

image

(Images are not mine.)

The name seems pretty self-explanatory - crocodile for the long, flat, toothy…

I knew “the anti-freeze for blood” bit, but this is more in-depth - I did not know they didn’t have red blood cells!  Very interesting!  Warning - contains fish guts.




Photo Post Thu, Feb. 27, 2014 124 notes

montereybayaquarium:

It’s #ThrowbackThursday! It may not look like much, but this weathered building on Cannery Row played a huge role in the creation of the Aquarium. Can you describe its significance? Maybe today’s Google Doodle, celebrating Steinbeck’s birthday, can provide a clue!
Check out the Google Doodle
Learn more about our history


It’s Ed Rickett’s lab.
Steinbeck’s 112th birthday - I think The Red Pony was the first book of his I read in elementary school - I bawled my eyes out.  And Cannery Row was inspired by Ed Ricketts, who wrote one of my college marine biology textbooks, Between Pacific Tides - he and Steinbeck were good friends.   Steinbeck tagged along with himon a specimen collecting expedition that became The Log from the Sea of Cortez.
And two of the fry have had to read Of Mice and Men in school recently.

montereybayaquarium:

It’s #ThrowbackThursday! It may not look like much, but this weathered building on Cannery Row played a huge role in the creation of the Aquarium. Can you describe its significance? Maybe today’s Google Doodle, celebrating Steinbeck’s birthday, can provide a clue!

Check out the Google Doodle

Learn more about our history

It’s Ed Rickett’s lab.

Steinbeck’s 112th birthday - I think The Red Pony was the first book of his I read in elementary school - I bawled my eyes out.  And Cannery Row was inspired by Ed Ricketts, who wrote one of my college marine biology textbooks, Between Pacific Tides - he and Steinbeck were good friends.  Steinbeck tagged along with himon a specimen collecting expedition that became The Log from the Sea of Cortez.

And two of the fry have had to read Of Mice and Men in school recently.




Photo Post Tue, Feb. 25, 2014 203,728 notes

ofpaperandponies:

mad-as-a-marine-biologist:

oxidoreductase:

hotdogcephalopod:

nooby-banana:

ironychan:

ilymorgannn:

I’m terrified of the ocean but I love what inhabits it

I don’t know what this thing is but it can probably kill you in at least six horrible ways.

It’s a Spanish Dancer!! :D  It’s a type of sea slug that eats poisonous animals for breakfast and then absorbs their toxic power for itself. Their badass menu includes sea sponges and Portugese Man-O-Wars.

God bless sea slugs

Sea slugs and nudibranchs!!!

Ummmm… this is a flatworm. Phylum Platyhelminthes. They are about three cells thick and have no body cavity or circulatory or respiratory organs. They do mate by ‘penis fencing’, so that’s fun for them. 

Sigh. Poor Spanish Dancers. Always being confused with Platys and Glaucus sp. :( They’re beauties (as are most warm-water marine flatworms), but are most certainly neither of those.The confusion with Spanish Dancers, I can get. Alright, so they don’t have “nude lungs” (nudibranch!), but their colors are pretty similar. But Spannys don’t eat man-o-wars! They don’t even go close to the surface! Not all sea slugs are Glaucus. Glaucs are FUCKING COOL and so are most others…but not for the same reasons!
MARINE BIO, YO. LEARN TO LOVE IT. Respect it!

Amen.  Also, not everything in the ocean is capable of killing you, although oddly enough, some critters that get the most love are very capable.  People return that dubious favor a million times over.

ofpaperandponies:

mad-as-a-marine-biologist:

oxidoreductase:

hotdogcephalopod:

nooby-banana:

ironychan:

ilymorgannn:

I’m terrified of the ocean but I love what inhabits it

I don’t know what this thing is but it can probably kill you in at least six horrible ways.

It’s a Spanish Dancer!! :D  It’s a type of sea slug that eats poisonous animals for breakfast and then absorbs their toxic power for itself. Their badass menu includes sea sponges and Portugese Man-O-Wars.

God bless sea slugs

Sea slugs and nudibranchs!!!

Ummmm… this is a flatworm. Phylum Platyhelminthes. They are about three cells thick and have no body cavity or circulatory or respiratory organs. They do mate by ‘penis fencing’, so that’s fun for them. 

Sigh. Poor Spanish Dancers. Always being confused with Platys and Glaucus sp. :( They’re beauties (as are most warm-water marine flatworms), but are most certainly neither of those.

The confusion with Spanish Dancers, I can get. Alright, so they don’t have “nude lungs” (nudibranch!), but their colors are pretty similar. But Spannys don’t eat man-o-wars! They don’t even go close to the surface!

Not all sea slugs are Glaucus. Glaucs are FUCKING COOL and so are most others…but not for the same reasons!

MARINE BIO, YO. LEARN TO LOVE IT. Respect it!

Amen.  Also, not everything in the ocean is capable of killing you, although oddly enough, some critters that get the most love are very capable.  People return that dubious favor a million times over.

(Source: cineraria)



1/32 older »