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Photo Post Tue, Oct. 21, 2014 24 notes

neaq:

Hey locals, free lecture! Along our New England shores, we have rolling meadows of kelp full of crabs, lobsters and more. But it’s not just us. Kelps beds, meadows, and forests are found in one quarter of the world’s coastal areas. But these big beautiful cold water algae have started to respond to changes in water temperatures and wave action.
Join us this Thursday, October 23, at 7pm to learn more about what kelps means for you and what changes may be in store for the future.
Photo: Brian Skerry, Aquarium Explorer in Residence, via New England Ocean Odyssey

Ifni knows senoritafish is fond of her native giant kelp forests, but it’s nice to see how pretty the local algae is in other areas, too, and how it might be affected by climate change.  Sounds interesting if you happen to be in Boston on Thursday…

neaq:

Hey locals, free lecture! Along our New England shores, we have rolling meadows of kelp full of crabs, lobsters and more. But it’s not just us. Kelps beds, meadows, and forests are found in one quarter of the world’s coastal areas. But these big beautiful cold water algae have started to respond to changes in water temperatures and wave action.

Join us this Thursday, October 23, at 7pm to learn more about what kelps means for you and what changes may be in store for the future.

Photo: Brian Skerry, Aquarium Explorer in Residence, via New England Ocean Odyssey

Ifni knows senoritafish is fond of her native giant kelp forests, but it’s nice to see how pretty the local algae is in other areas, too, and how it might be affected by climate change.  Sounds interesting if you happen to be in Boston on Thursday…





Photo Post Mon, Oct. 20, 2014 46 notes

mean-guign-photography:

Saddleback Anemonefish (Amphiprion polymnus) - Dauin, Philippines
the next generation…so many eyeballs!

Freaked me out for a bit - what anemonefish looks like that?! Does it have some disease? Then the second line clicked, and I looked closer.  Ah, eggs; about to hatch, maybe?

mean-guign-photography:

Saddleback Anemonefish (Amphiprion polymnus) - Dauin, Philippines

the next generation…so many eyeballs!

Freaked me out for a bit - what anemonefish looks like that?! Does it have some disease? Then the second line clicked, and I looked closer.  Ah, eggs; about to hatch, maybe?

(via mad-as-a-marine-biologist)





(via Sperm whales show in force off SoCal - GrindTV.com)

Apparently this many sperm whales at once has only been observed once before off Southern California…it’s been an interesting season.

(via Sperm whales show in force off SoCal - GrindTV.com)

Apparently this many sperm whales at once has only been observed once before off Southern California…it’s been an interesting season.




Video Post Thu, Oct. 02, 2014 352 notes

rhamphotheca:

Sharks Can Be ‘Social or Solitary’

by Jonathan Webb

The most feared predators in the sea have individual personalities that affect how readily they socialise, according to a study by UK scientists.

Individual sharks, studied in groups of ten, showed consistent social habits - either forming groups with other sharks or finding camouflage on their own.

When a group was shifted into a new environment, individual sharks showed the same patterns of behaviour.

This is the first study to show that sharks have their own personalities.

The research was done in large tanks at the Marine Biological Association of the UK, in Plymouth, in collaboration with the University of Exeter. The findings appear in the journal Behavioural Ecology and Sociobiology

(read more: BBC News)

Ah! Friend of mine just forwarded me this ariticle today…so even sharks can be introverts and extroverts!




Photo Post Tue, Sep. 16, 2014 8 notes

liquid-consciousness:

Sea cucumber, it’s a rare delicacy in Japan and subject to poaching. Dried sea cucumbers cost upwards of $300 per 100 grams. 

Again, not a sea cucumber; a gastropod. That’s a nudibranch - very pretty shell-less snails who keep their gills (branchae - those white-tipped projections on the back) uncovered (nudi). That one looks a bit pink, but there’s a similar translucent white one off the coast here that’s called a wedding-veil nudibranch (Hermissenda crassicornis). Many are very brightly colored.
Here’s a sea cucumber.
(there’s actually a fairly decent-sized fishery for sea cucumbers here in California - if the above is true, the fishermen here don’t get anywhere near that price for them.)

liquid-consciousness:

Sea cucumber, it’s a rare delicacy in Japan and subject to poaching. Dried sea cucumbers cost upwards of $300 per 100 grams. 

Again, not a sea cucumber; a gastropod. That’s a nudibranch - very pretty shell-less snails who keep their gills (branchae - those white-tipped projections on the back) uncovered (nudi). That one looks a bit pink, but there’s a similar translucent white one off the coast here that’s called a wedding-veil nudibranch (Hermissenda crassicornis). Many are very brightly colored.

Here’s a sea cucumber.

(there’s actually a fairly decent-sized fishery for sea cucumbers here in California - if the above is true, the fishermen here don’t get anywhere near that price for them.)

(via diveadvisor)




Photo Post Tue, Sep. 16, 2014 3 notes

(via Rare whale shark sighting documented near Catalina - Pete Thomas Outdoors)

Good grief, another  crazy tropical visitor.  Someone here in the office hypothesized it’s the several hurricanes in a row down south that are pushing the warm water up here.

(via Rare whale shark sighting documented near Catalina - Pete Thomas Outdoors)

Good grief, another crazy tropical visitor. Someone here in the office hypothesized it’s the several hurricanes in a row down south that are pushing the warm water up here.




Text Post Sun, Sep. 14, 2014 185,459 notes

dutchster:

when you have the hiccups while trying to sleep

image

Listening to a NOAA staff person talk on the Marine Mammal Protection Act and calculating PBRs and abundance, so I figure reblogging this is appropriate.

It kills me how harbor seals can get up on these little pinnacles and them just sort of blorp around to get in a comfy position to sun themselves. Hee.

(via kokonutkitten)






Video Post Thu, Sep. 04, 2014 1 note

Too Close for Comfort. A Great Wonderful Summer (GWS) experience

Local white shark encounter - divers working on removing net from a sunken purse seiner are investigated by (very pregnant-looking) female white shark while making a decompression stop while ascending. Not much place to hide if she decided she wasn’t hungry. However, this is not how whites take their prey usually; they generally ambush things at the surface from underneath - this one seemed to be curious.

Still, if that were me, the water would’ve probably gotten a lot warmer very quickly.

(Source: vimeo.com)




Video Post Wed, Aug. 06, 2014 627 notes

libutron:

Peronella lesueuri a beautiful sand dollar of importance in coastal ecosystem processes

The striking Peronella lesueuri (Clypeasteroida - Laganidae), is a large sand dollar up to 15 cm in diameter, with a wide Indo-Pacific distribution. The most noticeable and amazing feature of this species is its bright pink when alive, hence its common name of Pink sand dollar.

It is a shallow burrower and occurs at densities which may influence surface sediment chemistry and community dynamics. Therefore, knowledge of seasonal and diet movement rates and rhythms of this species are a key of interest in understanding coastal sediments biogeochemical dynamics.

References: [1]

Photo credit: ©Loh Kok Sheng | Locality: Pulau Sekudu (Frog Island), off Chek Jawa, Pulau Ubin, Singapore (2009) | [Top] - [Bottom]

Pretty critter!  Love that double star pattern. 

(via rhamphotheca)





(via How to control invasives? Put a fork in them! :: NOAA Fisheries)
Northern snakeheads - Do you think a fish as invasive and ugly as the northern snakehead could be yummy to eat? There’s a grassroots movement to create a market demand to control the spread of this species.
Um, I thought I’d read that’s kind of how they got to the US in the first place. To eat. You’d think it would be a fine way to get rid of them, but once people start liking something, they tend to want to keep it around, and markets want a steady supply.
We have a similar problem with Chinese mitten crabs in the San Francisco Bay/Sacramento Delta area - not only invasive but they damage the flood-control dykes in the Sacramento River Delta by burrowing. They’re also a delicacy in their home range, but I believe they got here through larvae in ship ballast water.  I think you’re allowed to take them recreationally (no limit), but not commercially, thus no incentive to create a fishery with a monetary value.

(via How to control invasives? Put a fork in them! :: NOAA Fisheries)

Northern snakeheads - Do you think a fish as invasive and ugly as the northern snakehead could be yummy to eat? There’s a grassroots movement to create a market demand to control the spread of this species.

Um, I thought I’d read that’s kind of how they got to the US in the first place. To eat. You’d think it would be a fine way to get rid of them, but once people start liking something, they tend to want to keep it around, and markets want a steady supply.

We have a similar problem with Chinese mitten crabs in the San Francisco Bay/Sacramento Delta area - not only invasive but they damage the flood-control dykes in the Sacramento River Delta by burrowing. They’re also a delicacy in their home range, but I believe they got here through larvae in ship ballast water.  I think you’re allowed to take them recreationally (no limit), but not commercially, thus no incentive to create a fishery with a monetary value.




Photo Post Fri, Jun. 27, 2014 86,099 notes

walkingfoxy:

fuckyeahpaganism:

Hag stones, also known as Holey Stones or Witch Stones are stones that have a naturally occurring hole and are usually found near oceans and other bodies of water. They are said to be powerful protection talismans, and when worn or carried they protect the bearer from curses, hexes, negative spirits, and harm. They have also been used to prevent nightmares, being strung on a bedpost or placed underneath pillows. It is also believed that if you peer through the hole of the stone that you can see the Fae Folk and otherworldly entities. If one broke, it is thought to have used its power to protect a life. 
(x)

i want one of these so fucking bad. spiderwick chronicles, and coraline both had these sort of things in them. i swear to god i would wander through the woods looking through one of these for days if given the chance.

Not that I’m averse to the stories about these items, but if you wandered through the woods to find one of these you probably wouldn’t have very much luck - as the first poster said they’re usually found near oceans.  That’s because the holes are made by a family of rock-boring clams; Pholoadidae, the piddocks.  They rotate the rough teeth on the anterior end of their shells to drill themselves into mud, clay and softer rocks - slate (as above), sandstone, and they’ve been known to drill into cement and other mollusc shells. Their burrows are often used by other critters after they’re gone, and of course when weathering, surf and erosion have done their work, you wind up with the above.
Of course, bivalves have been around for a very long time, so if your forest  was growing on a former seabed or ocean shore, you might find trace fossil remnants of these (trace fossil being something the animal left behind, not the animal itself).
(Images of piddocks and the holes they drill)

walkingfoxy:

fuckyeahpaganism:

Hag stones, also known as Holey Stones or Witch Stones are stones that have a naturally occurring hole and are usually found near oceans and other bodies of water. They are said to be powerful protection talismans, and when worn or carried they protect the bearer from curses, hexes, negative spirits, and harm. They have also been used to prevent nightmares, being strung on a bedpost or placed underneath pillows. It is also believed that if you peer through the hole of the stone that you can see the Fae Folk and otherworldly entities. If one broke, it is thought to have used its power to protect a life. 

(x)

i want one of these so fucking bad. spiderwick chronicles, and coraline both had these sort of things in them. i swear to god i would wander through the woods looking through one of these for days if given the chance.

Not that I’m averse to the stories about these items, but if you wandered through the woods to find one of these you probably wouldn’t have very much luck - as the first poster said they’re usually found near oceans.  That’s because the holes are made by a family of rock-boring clams; Pholoadidae, the piddocks.  They rotate the rough teeth on the anterior end of their shells to drill themselves into mud, clay and softer rocks - slate (as above), sandstone, and they’ve been known to drill into cement and other mollusc shells. Their burrows are often used by other critters after they’re gone, and of course when weathering, surf and erosion have done their work, you wind up with the above.

Of course, bivalves have been around for a very long time, so if your forest  was growing on a former seabed or ocean shore, you might find trace fossil remnants of these (trace fossil being something the animal left behind, not the animal itself).

(Images of piddocks and the holes they drill)

(via withasmoothroundstone)




Listen to "An Ancient Animal's Blood Is a Modern Medical Miracle" on Stitcher

Very interesting story on collecting horseshoe crabs for medical reasons - would you call this a fishery, if most are released alive?




Photo Post Sun, Jun. 08, 2014 272 notes

newsweek:

Scientists in Australia tagged a healthy 9-foot great white shark as part of program to track these animals. Four months later they found the tracking device washed up on a beach. Something—something really big—had eaten this apex predator. But what creature could dine on such ferocious prey? 

Scientists: A mysterious animal ate an entire 9-foot great white shark

My first thought was how did they they know it was eaten? Because tags often are shed, especially if not attached properly; however, there’s a link at the bottom to the mystery, solved.  (And damn my scatological sense of humor, one of the last comments on the second article tickled me.)

Hint: a 9’ great white is really not all that great.

newsweek:

Scientists in Australia tagged a healthy 9-foot great white shark as part of program to track these animals. Four months later they found the tracking device washed up on a beach. Something—something really big—had eaten this apex predator. But what creature could dine on such ferocious prey?

Scientists: A mysterious animal ate an entire 9-foot great white shark

My first thought was how did they they know it was eaten? Because tags often are shed, especially if not attached properly; however, there’s a link at the bottom to the mystery, solved.

(And damn my scatological sense of humor, one of the last comments on the second article tickled me.)

Hint: a 9’ great white is really not all that great.




Video Post Thu, Jun. 05, 2014 542 notes

jtotheizzoe:

smartereveryday:

Whoa! Had Disney elected to make Finding Nemo scientifically accurate, Marlin would have turned into a female and mated with Nemo. Freaky. I’m glad they didn’t.

Welcome to the wonderful world of protandric hermaphroditism!! It’s surprisingly common among fish, who probably think that we land-lubbing air-breathers are pretty weird for being so set in our gender ways. Being able to change sexes is a great survival adaptation for Nemo’s kind, a way to make sure that there are always enough breeding partners to go around, and that everyone has an spread their genes.

The size difference between male and female clownfish or anemone fish is also an example of something called sexual dimorphism, which is seen in all kinds of species (including us). There’s many kinds of sexual dimorphism in nature, and all kinds of reasons for it, but bigger clownfish females may be able to produce more eggs, while smaller males may be able to migrate more easily between anemones to find a mate. Any know of other theories?

Destin, judging by your kids’ reactions, I’m not the only one who would enjoy watching the scientifically accurate Finding Nemo

As opposed to California sheephead (Semicossyphous pulcher), which are protogynous hermaphrodites, like many in the wrasse family.  They’re all born females, which are slender and uniformly pink to red. If the local large male disappears, the largest and most dominant female will begin a rather dramatic transformation into a male, developing a black head and tail, heavy jaws, and a characteristic forehead bump - while retaining the species white lower jaw, red middle, and large, dog-like teeth.  Sometimes you can see individuals that are in the midst of the change, heads and tails graying but bodies still slender.

It’s an invertebrate, here in California, that’s a protandrous hermaphrodite. Spot prawns (Pandalus platyceros), a handsome deep water shrimp with four white dots on its abdomen, stripey cephalothoraxes and an extremely long pointy rostrum, are all males when small, while larger ones above a certain size have morphed into females. In the spot prawn’s case, sexual dimorphism is only in size.

Coincidentally, both of these species are popular with restaurants that specialize in keeping aquariums of live animals just prior to being cooked and served - partially because they’re fairly hardy and stand up to transport. Female sheephead are prized in certain Asian restaurants because they look similar to a fish on the other side of the Pacific, considered auspicious because of their red coloring.

(via madgeneticist)



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