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Photo Post Sun, Apr. 06, 2014 183 notes

rhamphotheca:

The American paddlefish, Polyodon spathula
… is a paddlefish living in slow-flowing waters of the Mississippi River drainage system. It appears to have been extirpated from Lake Erie and its tributaries. They are closely related to the sturgeons.
This large Chondrostean freshwater fish may grow to 220 cm (7 feet) and weigh up to 100 kg (220 lbs). The paddlefish takes its common and scientific names from its distinctive snout, which is greatly elongated and flattened into a paddle shape. The American paddlefish is believed to use sensitive electroreceptors on its paddle to detect prey, as well as to navigate while migrating to spawning sites. It feeds primarily on zooplankton but also feeds on crustaceans and bivalves…
(read more: Wikipedia)
illustration by Timothy Knepp, USFWS

rhamphotheca:

The American paddlefish, Polyodon spathula

… is a paddlefish living in slow-flowing waters of the Mississippi River drainage system. It appears to have been extirpated from Lake Erie and its tributaries. They are closely related to the sturgeons.

This large Chondrostean freshwater fish may grow to 220 cm (7 feet) and weigh up to 100 kg (220 lbs). The paddlefish takes its common and scientific names from its distinctive snout, which is greatly elongated and flattened into a paddle shape. The American paddlefish is believed to use sensitive electroreceptors on its paddle to detect prey, as well as to navigate while migrating to spawning sites. It feeds primarily on zooplankton but also feeds on crustaceans and bivalves

(read more: Wikipedia)

illustration by Timothy Knepp, USFWS

(via scientificillustration)




Video Post Tue, Apr. 01, 2014 1 note

Shrimpfish, in the same order as seahorses and pipefish. It’s thought they adopt this head down posture because they like to hide among sea urchin spines and vertical weeds; but they swim - horizontally, but vertically - pretty well that way too…

This was also at AOP; please forgive the weird reflections and slight blurriness. Last time I was there they had maybe three or four in a tiny tank of maybe two gallons, and now they have a school of them!  The tank is this sort of wedge-shaped thing with no air surface on the display side.

Note: there are also ribbon pipehorses near the bottom in this video.

Not sure what’s going on here - it plays on my dash and posts page but not on  my main page.  If you can’t see it let me know and I’ll put up a link.




Photo Post Tue, Apr. 01, 2014 1,557 notes

astronomy-to-zoology:

Goldfish (Carassius cenularisustergum)
…a small species of cyprinid fish that is endemic to a wide variety of mountain lakes in Switzerland. A collector in the United States had introduced a captive population in 1937 into a lake in her Connecticut property but, after a unfortunate series of ecological events the population of C. cenularisustergum had escaped and has become an invasive species in a number of countries around the world. Goldfish are highly adaptable and can occupy a wide range of habitats across the globe, which has lead to their reproductive success worldwide. Like other members of the genus Carassius goldfish are often seen in large groups (known as a “bag”) with individuals packed as close together as they can. The exact reason for this behavior is still unknown but it is thought that this is done to prevent predators from singling out an individual to eat. However, some experiments disprove this theory, stating that predators will attempt to eat as many of the small fish as possible, and that congregation would not heighten an individual’s chances of survival.
Due to their cosmopolitan distribution C. cenularisustergum is preyed upon by a large number of predators, from all walks of life. Their main predator is humans (Homo sapiens) which will farm  the small cyprinids by the millions. By using a special devise known as a Pepperidge Farm. Even though they are harvested in millions, farming had no significant effect on their population as C. cenularisustergum has a high reproductive rate, with individuals capable of producing thousands of young in special nests known as “Cartons”. C. cenularisustergum is sometimes known as the “smiling fish” due to its wide gape, it uses this wide but thin mouth to efficiently graze on algae that grows on smooth rocks.
Classification
Animalia-Chordata-Actinopterygii-Cypriniformes-Cyprinidae-Carassius-(cibum)-C. cenularisustergum
Image: Kenzie

astronomy-to-zoology:

Goldfish (Carassius cenularisustergum)

…a small species of cyprinid fish that is endemic to a wide variety of mountain lakes in Switzerland. A collector in the United States had introduced a captive population in 1937 into a lake in her Connecticut property but, after a unfortunate series of ecological events the population of C. cenularisustergum had escaped and has become an invasive species in a number of countries around the world. Goldfish are highly adaptable and can occupy a wide range of habitats across the globe, which has lead to their reproductive success worldwide. Like other members of the genus Carassius goldfish are often seen in large groups (known as a “bag”) with individuals packed as close together as they can. The exact reason for this behavior is still unknown but it is thought that this is done to prevent predators from singling out an individual to eat. However, some experiments disprove this theory, stating that predators will attempt to eat as many of the small fish as possible, and that congregation would not heighten an individual’s chances of survival.

Due to their cosmopolitan distribution C. cenularisustergum is preyed upon by a large number of predators, from all walks of life. Their main predator is humans (Homo sapiens) which will farm  the small cyprinids by the millions. By using a special devise known as a Pepperidge Farm. Even though they are harvested in millions, farming had no significant effect on their population as C. cenularisustergum has a high reproductive rate, with individuals capable of producing thousands of young in special nests known as “Cartons”. C. cenularisustergum is sometimes known as the “smiling fish” due to its wide gape, it uses this wide but thin mouth to efficiently graze on algae that grows on smooth rocks.

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Actinopterygii-Cypriniformes-Cyprinidae-Carassius-(cibum)-C. cenularisustergum

Image: Kenzie

(via rhamphotheca)




Video Post Sat, Mar. 29, 2014 3 notes

Trying out the camera on my new phone @ AOP last weekend. Really like the HDR function used on the 1st pic with oldest fry contemplating the live coral tank. And I don’t think I’d seen the life-size model blue whale from that angle before…






Photo Post Mon, Mar. 24, 2014 39 notes

cmog:

Bowl with Fish and Waves by Thomas Webb and Sons, about 1890. Corning Museum of Glass. (via Bowl with Fish and Waves | Corning Museum of Glass)

This is gorgeous!  Click the link and then the little symbol with 4 diagonal arrows (sorry, but that doesn’t immediately scream “ZOOM” at me) for a closeup.  There are a lot more fish there than is obvious.

cmog:

Bowl with Fish and Waves by Thomas Webb and Sons, about 1890. Corning Museum of Glass. (via Bowl with Fish and Waves | Corning Museum of Glass)

This is gorgeous!  Click the link and then the little symbol with 4 diagonal arrows (sorry, but that doesn’t immediately scream “ZOOM” at me) for a closeup.  There are a lot more fish there than is obvious.





Video Post Fri, Mar. 14, 2014 141 notes

That’s a biologist for you.

(From Nagi no Asukara (Nagi-Asu: A Lull in the Sea )- on Crunchyroll. To look up once I get the Roku hooked up…

(Source: mmpanime, via bogleech)




Photo Post Wed, Mar. 05, 2014 243 notes

rhamphotheca:

Longbarb Scaly Dragonfish
Fire in the Sea, published by Texas A&M University Press


This species has an extremely long—six to 11 times the length of the head—chin barbel, which is tipped with a bulb and filaments that produce light. “The night belonged to him. The light belonged to him. He hung it from a long whip from his chin. Squid and red shrimps and foolish fish came to see in the golden glow of his chandelier the promise of dining,” Compton wrote.

(via: Popular Science)

This is a book for my wish list!

rhamphotheca:

Longbarb Scaly Dragonfish

Fire in the Sea, published by Texas A&M University Press
This species has an extremely long—six to 11 times the length of the head—chin barbel, which is tipped with a bulb and filaments that produce light. “The night belonged to him. The light belonged to him. He hung it from a long whip from his chin. Squid and red shrimps and foolish fish came to see in the golden glow of his chandelier the promise of dining,” Compton wrote.

This is a book for my wish list!




Photo Post Wed, Mar. 05, 2014 150 notes

rhamphotheca:

The Frilled Shark
Fire in the Sea, published by Texas A&M University Press


This shark species, shown at right with a squid in its jaws, is rarely found outside of the benthic zone. “Neither squid nor shark desired outside help and interference,” Compton wrote in his narrative.
(via: Popular Science)

rhamphotheca:

The Frilled Shark

Fire in the Sea, published by Texas A&M University Press

This shark species, shown at right with a squid in its jaws, is rarely found outside of the benthic zone. “Neither squid nor shark desired outside help and interference,” Compton wrote in his narrative.

(via: Popular Science)




Photo Post Wed, Mar. 05, 2014 89 notes

rhamphotheca:


Batfish

from Fire in the Sea, published by Texas A&M University Press
The round, flat batfish is primarily found in the western Atlantic ocean and the Gulf of Mexico. “Batfish are about as reliable in sustained swim as a scallop is; however, they can make two jumps and a gobble from prone position faster than a Sidewinder Rattlesnake can strike second time,” Compton wrote.
(via: Popular Science)

rhamphotheca:

Batfish
from Fire in the Sea, published by Texas A&M University Press

The round, flat batfish is primarily found in the western Atlantic ocean and the Gulf of Mexico. “Batfish are about as reliable in sustained swim as a scallop is; however, they can make two jumps and a gobble from prone position faster than a Sidewinder Rattlesnake can strike second time,” Compton wrote.

(via: Popular Science)




Video Post Thu, Feb. 27, 2014 44,198 notes

newvagabond:

fdsiof;adsf

Whatever caused Tunalock is contagious, I see…. XD

(Source: illusionrogue, via coffeebuddha)




Link Post Thu, Feb. 27, 2014 53 notes

Meet the Icefish.

excalculus:

I have free time, and that means more biology! Today’s creature is one I’ve been meaning to write about for a while: the crocodile icefish, Pagetopsis macropterus.

image

(Images are not mine.)

The name seems pretty self-explanatory - crocodile for the long, flat, toothy…

I knew “the anti-freeze for blood” bit, but this is more in-depth - I did not know they didn’t have red blood cells!  Very interesting!  Warning - contains fish guts.




Photo Post Tue, Feb. 25, 2014 11,704 notes

cephalopodqueen:

lackofa:

exploresque:

お魚(リク終了)

these are some of the cutest renditions of fish I have ever seen!

dangit a buncha my favorite fish are on here and it’s super cuteI wish I’d made this thing.>8O

Chibi actual fishies!  Eee!
Although, possibly for spacing reasons, Mr. Oarfish is the wrong orientation.  Normally would be head up, tail down, and using his dorsal fin to propel himself - rather like a seahorse.

cephalopodqueen:

lackofa:

exploresque:

お魚(リク終了)

these are some of the cutest renditions of fish I have ever seen!

dangit a buncha my favorite fish are on here and it’s super cute
I wish I’d made this thing.>8O

Chibi actual fishies!  Eee!

Although, possibly for spacing reasons, Mr. Oarfish is the wrong orientation.  Normally would be head up, tail down, and using his dorsal fin to propel himself - rather like a seahorse.

(via realmonstrosities)



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