Animals Tumblr Themes

Photo Post Mon, Apr. 16, 2012 181 notes

rhamphotheca:

Tiktaalik: The “Fishapod”
by National Geo staff
Discovered in Arctic Canada in 2004, 375 million-year-old Tiktaalik had not only gills and scales but traits of a tetrapod (four-legged land animal), including limblike fins, ribs, a flexible neck, and a croc-shaped head.
Why it matters:  Tiktaalik is seen as evidence of the period when our aquatic ancestors began moving ashore—along with other fins-to-limbs fossils, such as Acanthostega (Acanthostega picture), the most primitive known tetrapod. Early Darwin supporters speculated that such fishes had given rise to amphibians. “Acanthostega and Tiktaalik have taken this to a new level,” said geologist Donald Prothero, of Occidental College in Los Angeles. The discoveries of these and other “missing link” species have helped dispel what Darwin called perhaps “the most obvious and gravest objection which can be urged against my theory” of evolution—the former lack of transitional fossil species.
(via: National Geo)       (illustration by Zina Deretsky, NSF)

rhamphotheca:

Tiktaalik: The “Fishapod”

by National Geo staff

Discovered in Arctic Canada in 2004, 375 million-year-old Tiktaalik had not only gills and scales but traits of a tetrapod (four-legged land animal), including limblike fins, ribs, a flexible neck, and a croc-shaped head.

Why it matters:  Tiktaalik is seen as evidence of the period when our aquatic ancestors began moving ashore—along with other fins-to-limbs fossils, such as Acanthostega (Acanthostega picture), the most primitive known tetrapod. Early Darwin supporters speculated that such fishes had given rise to amphibians. “Acanthostega and Tiktaalik have taken this to a new level,” said geologist Donald Prothero, of Occidental College in Los Angeles.

The discoveries of these and other “missing link” species have helped dispel what Darwin called perhaps “the most obvious and gravest objection which can be urged against my theory” of evolution—the former lack of transitional fossil species.

(via: National Geo)       (illustration by Zina Deretsky, NSF)

(via scientificillustration)




COMMENTS
  1. annekaelizabeth reblogged this from scientificillustration
  2. sinovenator reblogged this from rhamphotheca
  3. thosecrazyhues reblogged this from senoritafish and added:
    Brings me back to why the theory of evolution stills amazes me. To no end
  4. b-sidetothisawkward-life reblogged this from yaoi420
  5. moistchunkyslurp reblogged this from yaoi420
  6. yaoi420 reblogged this from whatwentonhere
  7. alw123 reblogged this from dendroica and added:
    OH MY GOD!!! I’m reading this book right now!!!!!!!!!!!!
  8. peanutsupper reblogged this from dendroica
  9. thistoooshallpass reblogged this from dendroica
  10. darianish reblogged this from dendroica
  11. dendroica reblogged this from scientificillustration
  12. maddy-moose reblogged this from candidlycara
  13. deziac reblogged this from candidlycara
  14. somemutantlovechild reblogged this from candidlycara
  15. neoncupccakes reblogged this from candidlycara
  16. kittenberryy reblogged this from candidlycara
  17. soldierofinquisition reblogged this from untiltheacropolis
  18. untiltheacropolis reblogged this from astonyen
  19. astonyen reblogged this from p-e-r-e-g-r-i-n-e
  20. hippiesalad reblogged this from candidlycara
  21. alwaysbrightinmyeyes reblogged this from candidlycara
  22. capslockdoesntexpressmyjoy reblogged this from candidlycara
  23. killvia-plath reblogged this from candidlycara and added:
    TIKTAALIK IS THE CUTEST
blog comments powered by Disqus
1/1