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Video Post Fri, Aug. 01, 2014 22,413 notes

aprillikesthings:

Wait isn’t this a character from FLCL

Canti!

(Source: somethinglikegraham)




Text Post Fri, Aug. 01, 2014 226 notes

halflock:

fleshy-sun replied to your post: anonymous asked:Have you drawn fa…

You should draw some sofa!lock, now that you’ve said that

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The cat hair that just magically covers everything, even tho’ kitty hasn’t moved…

So is this an extension of the john-is-made-of-kittens thing? ;p

(via aiwa-sensei)






Video Post Thu, Jul. 31, 2014 63,607 notes

teaplusbeardspluscake:

femmeanddangerous:

nofreedomlove:

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"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."

Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.

One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.

It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.

"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

These are just so damn great.

Oh god I love these

I keep liking these; finally reblogging. Wish I could take more of them completely to heart myself. I.e. I haven’t shaved in decades and tell myself I don’t care, but because I live in So CA, I’m not comfortable wearing shorts and sleeveless things in public. Wish I could just turn off the worry about what other people think.

(via aprillikesthings)




Photo Post Thu, Jul. 31, 2014 84 notes

zoologyillustration:

I’ve been developing two possible banners to go outside of the Natural History Museum and light posts around town. Which one do you like the best?

Hmm.  The pelican is kind of an icon for coastal areas - I hate to say cliche, because I really like pelicans.  For a touristy place like Pacific Grove (near Monterey CA), I’m sure it’s fine, as you get a lot of visitors from outside the area or from inland, where they’re not such a familiar sight - and they’re always pretty striking in their breeding colors. 
While I like all the other animals on the other one, it’s a bit busy for street banner, where most people will be driving by it quickly.  And, I dunno, the big central, obviously taxidermied bear is a bit offputting for me.  Natural history to me is learning about how animals live and fit with their environments.  I know mounts and animal specimens are a large part of that, but still…

zoologyillustration:

I’ve been developing two possible banners to go outside of the Natural History Museum and light posts around town. Which one do you like the best?

Hmm.  The pelican is kind of an icon for coastal areas - I hate to say cliche, because I really like pelicans.  For a touristy place like Pacific Grove (near Monterey CA), I’m sure it’s fine, as you get a lot of visitors from outside the area or from inland, where they’re not such a familiar sight - and they’re always pretty striking in their breeding colors. 

While I like all the other animals on the other one, it’s a bit busy for street banner, where most people will be driving by it quickly.  And, I dunno, the big central, obviously taxidermied bear is a bit offputting for me.  Natural history to me is learning about how animals live and fit with their environments.  I know mounts and animal specimens are a large part of that, but still…

(via scientificillustration)




Text Post Thu, Jul. 31, 2014 83 notes

metapianycist:

today at a family event, one of my fiancé’s relatives saw my “Autism Speaks hurts autistic people” bag and told me about how her father just got a tattoo that said “Autism isn’t a choice. Acceptance is.”

*smiles extremely broadly*

(via autisticadvocacy)






Photo Post Wed, Jul. 30, 2014 9,544 notes

It morning of course yes…

It morning of course yes…

(Source: amyvdh, via coffeebuddha)




Photo Post Wed, Jul. 30, 2014 31,480 notes

grumpyfaceurn:

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

 Woking (ptcpl. vb.): Standing in the kitchen wondering what you came in here for.
- Douglas Adams, The Meaning of Liff

No wonder I’ve been having senior moments my entire life!

grumpyfaceurn:

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

Woking (ptcpl. vb.): Standing in the kitchen wondering what you came in here for.

- Douglas Adams, The Meaning of Liff

No wonder I’ve been having senior moments my entire life!

(via aprillikesthings)




Photo Post Tue, Jul. 29, 2014 2,493 notes

birdandmoon:

A year ago I got to illustrate one of the endings in Ryan North’s brilliant Hamlet choose-your-own-path book To Be or Not To Be. These are all things you may be able to find outside right now (if you can bear to put down this amazing book).

Lately, the army of ladies has been coming inside, and I’m trying to figure out ways of convincing them to stay out.
At least they’re not committing suicide in the freezer like they were a few years ago.  We’d open it up and there would be a two-inch pile of frozen ants under the ice cube dispenser where they were crawling inside.  Creepy.

birdandmoon:

A year ago I got to illustrate one of the endings in Ryan North’s brilliant Hamlet choose-your-own-path book To Be or Not To Be. These are all things you may be able to find outside right now (if you can bear to put down this amazing book).

Lately, the army of ladies has been coming inside, and I’m trying to figure out ways of convincing them to stay out.

At least they’re not committing suicide in the freezer like they were a few years ago.  We’d open it up and there would be a two-inch pile of frozen ants under the ice cube dispenser where they were crawling inside.  Creepy.




Photo Post Tue, Jul. 29, 2014 26 notes

mindblowingscience:

The Great Giant Flea Hunt

By CAROL KAESUK YOON JULY 28, 2014

In the Pacific Northwest, we live among behemoths — snowcapped volcanoes, towering trees, great splashing salmon and lattes as big as a child’s head. Yet one of the region’s undeniably superlative titans has slipped beneath everyone’s radar.
The land of Bigfoot and Starbucks is also home to the world’s largest flea. The flea, Hystrichopsylla schefferi, is an awe-inspiring colossus that can reach nearly half an inch, its head alone the size of a cat or dog flea. Until last month, however, there existed not a single confirmed photograph of a live member of the species.
Never mind that with ubiquitous digital cameras, the documentation of life has exploded, or the fact that the flea lives on the mountain beaver, Aplodontia rufa, a species so abundant in forests and gardens around here that it is considered a pest.



Continue Reading.


Ha! Until I clicked the link and read further, I thought this might have been from fakescience or facts-i-just-made-up. Funny field science - although, I haven’t met many entomologists who were quite that squeamish.  I can’t say I know that many, however…
OTOH, a flea that big might just make me a little squeamish…

mindblowingscience:

The Great Giant Flea Hunt

JULY 28, 2014

In the Pacific Northwest, we live among behemoths — snowcapped volcanoes, towering trees, great splashing salmon and lattes as big as a child’s head. Yet one of the region’s undeniably superlative titans has slipped beneath everyone’s radar.

The land of Bigfoot and Starbucks is also home to the world’s largest flea. The flea, Hystrichopsylla schefferi, is an awe-inspiring colossus that can reach nearly half an inch, its head alone the size of a cat or dog flea. Until last month, however, there existed not a single confirmed photograph of a live member of the species.

Never mind that with ubiquitous digital cameras, the documentation of life has exploded, or the fact that the flea lives on the mountain beaver, Aplodontia rufa, a species so abundant in forests and gardens around here that it is considered a pest.

Ha! Until I clicked the link and read further, I thought this might have been from fakescience or facts-i-just-made-up. Funny field science - although, I haven’t met many entomologists who were quite that squeamish.  I can’t say I know that many, however…

OTOH, a flea that big might just make me a little squeamish…

(via madgeneticist)




Video Post Tue, Jul. 29, 2014 11 notes

nightjarlette:

We’ve got this beautiful teapot that has a tiger roaring as its spout but we never use it because the design is confusing and you’re supposed to pour the water into the bottom or something? Why couldn’t you just make a lid

Oh cool!  I saw a similarly designed one in a catalog once and always kicked myself for not buying it because I haven’t seen one since (to be fair, that was before convenient internet searches and I’d forgotten about it completely).  It was a lidless teapot - to amaze your guests at “how did the tea get in there - how the hell does it work?!” factor, I guess. 

It wasn’t recommended to actually brew your tea in there due to the difficulty of getting the leaves out - you had to brew it first and then put it in the hole in the bottom.  More for the novelty of serving than actually being practical, but I thought it was pretty neat. The one I saw was a pretty standard blue & white teapot design (more like these) - I really like the shape and the handle on this one!




Video Post Tue, Jul. 29, 2014 34 notes

Friend of mine at work posted these on Facebook yesterday (FB doesn’t share nicely with Tumblr like Tumblr does with FB. Play nice, FB!). Right in front of her neighbor’s house in a crepe myrtle tree; she took these with her phone - no telephoto or anything. A car went by and she thought he’d take off, but he just leaned back a little.  All the little birds were making a fuss because of the predator, but then her neighbor came out to chat and complained about the noisy crows. No words about the owl at all; just that the crows were “scary.” 

o_0

(Photos by Valerie Taylor; posted with permission)




Video Post Mon, Jul. 28, 2014 560,669 notes

sunwukong-stoaway:

ringaroundtheprose:

the-captain-of-davesol:

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THE ULTIMATE FUCKING POST

You know it’s good when you bother to scroll all the way back up just to reblog it.

…Wait scroll up HOW OLD IS THIS THING

Omg, that has twice as many additions as the last time I saw it...XD

Actually, no, it had this much the last time I reblogged in in March 2013 - but it’s still pretty damn funny (this is the 4th time - yes I looked).

(and I still think he looks like Ofdensen…)

(Source: muumajii, via bleibimmerduselbst)




Video Post Mon, Jul. 28, 2014 41 notes

dieterunrath:

I was eating lunch in Venice Beach when we saw a bright flash and heard a huge explosion. Turns out lightning struck out of nowhere about 300 feet away and injured 14 people, a couple of those critically. Here are some aftermath pictures. 

[Flickr l Instagram l Facebook l Website]

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-lightning-strikes-southern-california-beaches-20140728-story.html

It has been really muggy and monsoonal here in So. CA, but this is really uncommon.  Usually the damp air condenses and forms thunderstorms when it works its way to the mountains and desert, not right here on the beach! I saw a comment somewhere that said the lifeguard should have gotten everyone out of the water when they realized there was an electrical storm, but it looks like no one realized that’s what was happening. Very sorry for the guy who passed away; I don’t think I’ve ever heard about someone being killed by lightning around here.

What seems really weird is in all the photos and newscasts it seems like a sunny if hazy day.  I live about 20 miles south of here and didn’t notice anything that seemed like thunderclouds nearby - just thin overcast the sun was still shining through. I was indoors a lot though; just too muggy for me.

It’s a scary thing.  When I worked for the forest service in the Sierra Mountains one summer (where thunderstorms are a daily occurence in the summertime - because of the phenomenon mentioned above) there was a treeless ridge we had to hike over where a whole team of pack horses were struck and killed a few years before. We were always told if you start to feel your hair standing up, RUN!  But those thunderstorms were really obvious - dark brooding clouds where you knew something was up.

Edit - was talking with my supervisor who lives in San Pedro - she said at that time yesterday she noticed it looked like it was acting as if it wanted to rain, and did hear some thunder right about then.  It must have been short-lived and cleared really quickly.




Text Post Fri, Jul. 25, 2014 115,337 notes

dajo42:

"tea is just leaf water!" "yeah well coffee is just bean water!" wow, it’s. it’s like everything is made of things. this door is just wood rectangle. this poster is just ink paper. this lemonade is just lemon water. wow, it’s like you can combine ingredients to make things that are more enjoyable than the initial parts of the equation. sure is a magical world we live in

(via ruminia)





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